15 Things I Love about the Chase Ink Business Preferred Card

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Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card

This is strongest-earning small business card and the card with the most valuable signup bonus. And it’s a $95 annual fee card, not a $450 annual fee card. Many readers can get a business card and probably should.

Chase even suggests that getting a small business card is one of the things you should do as you start your business, that it’s often the first resource many business owners look to as they start to grow. A small business card allow yous to separate business from personal expenses and builds the credit history and identity of your business.

Here are 15 things I love about the new Ink Business Preferred:

  1. 80,000 Point Signup Bonus

    Spend $5000 on your new card within 3 months and you’ll get 80,000 points. As you’ll see below, that can even be enough for a roundtrip business class award ticket between the US and Europe. (Chase points are super valuable because they transfer directly to a variety of airlines and hotels.)

  2. 3 Points Per Dollar on Travel

    Chase points are one of the most valuable currencies and you’ll earn 3 points per dollar on travel — that’s airlines, hotels, rental cars, tolls, even Uber.

  3. 3 Points Per Dollar on Shipping and Advertising on Social Media and Search Engines

    This is great for anyone who advertises on Facebook or Twitter, or who spends money advertising with Google. And those bills add up quickly. Earning triple points on that spend is going to be a really big boost.

  4. $150,000 spend cap on bonus categories

    Previously Chase’s business cards capped category bonus spend at $25,000 or $50,000 in a year. Being able to keep spending on this card in a big way is a great move for Chase to encourage not just a little bit of spend but a lot of spend through the product, and to let you keep earning big bonus points.

  5. $600 protection against theft or damage for your cell phone.

    Get up to $600 per claim in cell phone protection against covered theft or damage for you and your employees listed on your monthly cell phone bill when you pay it with your Chase Ink Business Preferred credit card. Maximum of 3 claims in a 12 month period with a $100 deductible per claim.

    Now, I got my cell phone’s cracked screen covered when I paid for it with my Chase Sapphire Preferred Card — but that was purchase protection, cracked the screen shortly after I purchased the phone.

    This benefit though is significant, since it’s real ongoing cost savings as well: those of you who pay to insure your phone against damage could consider pocketing cash savings every month if you paid your bill with this card.

  6. You can get more than one Ink Business Preferred Card if you have more than one business.

    Chase won’t approve this for everyone, of course, they’ll consider how much credit they wish to extend to you. But they don’t limit you to one card if you have multiple businesses.

  7. Ultimate Rewards Mall

    Additional points for your online shopping through access to the Chase Ultimate Rewards mall, a mileage-earning shopping portal that often has the most lucrative opportunities to earn extra points for the online purchases you’d make anyway.

  8. Points transfer to Singapore Airlines — one of the best airlines in the world, with great premium cabin availability, stopovers for a fee even on one-way awards, and very low fees

    It’s very rare indeed that you can ever use miles from Star Alliance partner programs like United MileagePlus, Aeroplan, or LifeMiles for long haul premium cabin travel on Singapore. But Singapore offers members using their own miles better award availability on most of their routes. Last year I flew Suites Class for 2 passengers from Sydney to Singapore and also from Singapore to Paris, and we were alone in the cabin to Paris.

    There are no fees for telephone booking. There are no fees for close-in award redemption. There are no fees for changing the time or date of travel on a Singapore Airlines award.

    Award cancel and redeposits cost $30. And they’ll warn you about penalties if you fail to cancel or change your ticket at least 24 hours prior to departure — if you no show and don’t bother to call, and still want your miles back, that will cost just $75.

  9. Points transfer to Korean Air — the airline with the most first class saver awards in the world

    They make great first class award space available to their members. Korean and Delta are partners, but since Delta SkyMiles members cannot redeem their miles for international first class (on any airline) there’s very little competition for the space.

    And not just one or two first class award seats either, I have seen 4 seats on Los Angeles and New York JFK flights.

    Korean flies to Atlanta; Chicago; Dallas; Honolulu; Las Vegas; Los Angeles; New York JFK; San Francisco; Seattle; and Washington Dulles. With all their US gateways you can almost always find award space to and from Asia.

  10. Korean Air points can be used for business class travel between the US and Europe

    Korean charges just 80,000 miles roundtrip. This means flying on their SkyTeam partner airlines like Delta, Air France and KLM. That’s a 36% savings on the 125,000 miles that Air France KLM Flying Blue charges (and don’t even get me started on Delta). In my experience you have access to the same saver award space that these airlines make available to their partners, too.

  11. Korean Air also offers great value awards to Hawaii

    They partner with Alaska Airlines and Hawaiian Airlines. Flights between the US mainland and Hawaii (or Mexico) are 30,000 miles roundtrip in coach and 60,000 in first.

  12. Points transfer to United Airlines MileagePlus

    United is one of the few airlines in the world that does not add fuel surcharges onto any awards and because that gives you access to availability across the Star Alliance and with easy online bookings.

  13. Points transfer to Air France which offers great business class award availability.

    They make far more award space available on Air France and KLM flights to their own members than they do to partners. I find really good space between the US and Europe, even on West Coast routes.

  14. Points transfer to Hyatt which gives you access to high-end hotel redemptions, reasonably-priced suite awards, and room upgrades with points.

    Hyatt lets you redeem ~ 60% more points than a standard room for a suite on a free night. And Hyatt lets you spend 6000 points per night on a qualifying paid rate stay to upgrade to a suite — at booking. And that 6000 point price is the same regardless of the price level of a hotel.

    You do have to pay the standard or Hyatt daily rate to use points to upgrade a paid reservation to a suite, and at a resort you have to book at least a deluxe room to be eligible to use points for upgrades. And free nights in suites require a minimum 3 night stay.


    Park Hyatt Aviara

  15. Points transfers with most airline and hotel partners are instant.

    This is great because you don’t risk awards disappearing this way. And you don’t need to transfer points to an airline or hotel program until you need them, since transfers happen quickly. (Singapore Airlines transfers in my experience take 12-24 hours but have taken as long as 36 — which is ok since Singapore has let me put awards on hold, then I’ll transfer the points).

“5/24 limits” apply to the card. That’s not a surprise, there are cards that Chase won’t give to some people who have had 5 or more new cards within the last 24 months. This doesn’t apply to everyone, but it does apply to many.

Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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Editorial note: any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any card issuer. Comments made in response to this post are not provided or commissioned nor have they been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any bank. It is not the responsibility of any advertiser to ensure that questions are answered, either. Terms and limitations apply to all offers.

Comments

  1. Useful post. I have the “old” Chase Ink card and like it because of the 5X points for cable and telecommunications bills. Good to know that I possibly could get this one as well under another business, but unfortunately I’m 5/24’d.

  2. My partner’s 5/24 exclusion is over on 8/19/18….. How long should we wait to apply for this business card after that date? One day, first of September, one month?….

  3. Is there a good way to check before applying to see if you’re subject to 5/24? Yes, I’m bad, I haven’t tracked the dates of my various CC applications. I currently have a Chase Ink Business Cash card that I should really swap out for this one.

  4. Being 18/24 is much more profitable despite this being a great card. May go for the Hyatt card.

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