Hotel Room Rates May Soon Include Lyft Credit and Amex Took a $2.6 Billion Hit Last Quarter

News and notes from around the interweb:

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

More articles by Gary Leff »

Pingbacks

Comments

  1. Actually – the AMEX piece is somewhat a positive news despite how the author framed the article. AMEX is finally bringing cash they hoarded overseas back into the US, which means they will have more funds to hopefully invest in products, employees, technology, etc.

    In the past the cash was a worthless stockpile they couldn’t move around much and made their cash flow sheet look pretty, but now the cash will start to be put into work for them.

    However, I wouldn’t be surprised if the bulk of the cash is used to prop up stock prices and bolster returns to shareholders rather than investments (wages, innovation, domestic growth, etc) benefiting the US economy.

  2. Right, because returns to shareholders don’t benefit the economy? I forgot, shareholders = rich people = essentially evil hitlers.

  3. I sense snarkiness.

    Trends and studies have proven time and time over the rich keeps getting richer with the % those accounting for a lopsided amount of our economy continues to get smaller while the middle class is disappearing.

    Clearly what companies have been doing (returning bulk of profits to shareholders) is not working for the US economy.

    When the baby boomers depart, we will have a huge income inequality problem on our hands and I sincerely hope those in the top 10% will wake up before it’s too late which at that point we will have much bigger problem on our hands than the US economy or Wall Street.

    I say that as a shareholder of multiple companies and as someone who is very fortunate to have a relatively comfortable life thus far financially.

  4. LOL, I sense a non-economist professing to know facts that don’t exist and are really just based on one man’s anecdote-based belief system. Seriously…nothing you said is supportable.

  5. Ok Hin, you and Golfingboy can go agree about “facts” like how the U.S. economy isn’t working and how return on capital is a bad thing. Make sure you put your money where your mouth is and sell your stocks if that’s what you think. And we wonder why the rich get richer?

  6. Rob, sounds like you have life all figured out. Good luck

    Golfingboy mentioned several facts, with the wealth inequality as a prime example of one such fact.

  7. @Golfingboy: “In the past the cash was a worthless stockpile”

    They could use the post-tax value as collateral to borrow (as Apple did) so that statement is incorrect.

  8. @Golfingboy:

    “Clearly what companies have been doing (returning bulk of profits to shareholders) is not working for the US economy.”

    Your proposal to prevent capital going to its highest-valued use will cause:

    “rich keeps getting richer” (sic)
    “continues to get smaller while the middle class is disappearing”. (sic)

  9. “Clearly what companies have been doing…is not working for the US economy.” What fact could possibly support a laughable conclusion like that when the US economy has been the largest on the planet for the past 130 years and counting?

  10. When I get a higher dividend that is reinvested to buy more stock, why do I feel like I’m not helping the economy? Thanks for easing my conscience. Must be the trickle down effect??

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *