The Most Innovative Frequent Flyer Program and United Plane Barred from Russian Airspace

News and notes from around the interweb:

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

More articles by Gary Leff »

Comments

  1. I would say EAS should be looked at on a case by case basis. There are definitely routes that don’t serve a practical purpose. However, I would think flights to some rural areas out west and Alaska would need EAS service. I think most routes could be eliminated in my home state of West Virginia as most of them are in driving distance of Charleston, Pittsburgh, or Columbus. The exemption might be Clarksburg as it is a pretty far drive to Pittsburgh and Charleston from there.

  2. Maybe someone was on board the United plane who has been sanctioned by Russia. US does just as much shit around the world as Russia does and just like we sanction their officials they sanction our officials as well. Someone on the plane might be high enough on the shit list to have fighters come up and force the plane down in Russia and arrest his ass. We have done similar when we have forced down planes in Europe and arrested Russian nationals. So the pilot was quietly informed by those Russians not keen to have another incident .”reroute or we will be forced to force you down”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *