Starwood Ending Caesars Partnership December 31

Three years ago — six months after Hyatt and MGM launched what practical amounts to hotel codesharing, with reciprocal earn and burn and elite status matching (that’s being somewhat diluted with the new World of Hyatt program) — Starwood and Caesars teamed up in a slightly less extensive deal.

There was no elite recognition for Starwood members at Caesars properties (although this came 18 months later), and only limited status-earning opportunities, but reciprocal earn and burn was available.


Copyright: quackersnaps / 123RF Stock Photo

To show just how strange the lodging world can be, Starwood Hotels and Resorts actually owned Caesars in the 90s.

However the Starwood-Caesars partnership is ending December 31. (HT: Cliff K.)

Starting January 1, 2017, SPG members may no longer book Starpoint redemption reservations at Caesars Entertainment destinations due to the conclusion of this partnership. Existing reservations taking place at a Caesars Entertainment property in 2017 are still valid and will be honored as confirmed. If you must cancel a reservation on or before December 31, 2016 please do so through SPG.com. If you must cancel a reservation on or after January 1, 2017, SPG members should email research@starwoodhotels.com with subject line: “Caesars” and provide the redemption reservation number, Caesars Entertainment property, arrival and departure date, first name, last name and email address associated with the reservation.

There’s no word at this point on whether the termination stems from the turmoil at Caesars or Marriott’s acquisition of Starwood. Either way, the deal must not have fulfilled expectations. Since MGM will no longer provide as lucrative a status match to Hyatt Gold Passport members next year, perhaps Hyatt’s deal isn’t as lucrative either.

About Gary Leff

Gary Leff is one of the foremost experts in the field of miles, points, and frequent business travel - a topic he has covered since 2002. Co-founder of frequent flyer community InsideFlyer.com, emcee of the Freddie Awards, and named one of the "World's Top Travel Experts" by Conde' Nast Traveler (2010-Present) Gary has been a guest on most major news media, profiled in several top print publications, and published broadly on the topic of consumer loyalty. More About Gary »

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Comments

  1. SPG did not have much of a Vegas presence. Marriott has a bunch of hotels off strip. I am sure this played into the decision

  2. I used this twice a year on business trips and as a Hyatt Diamond did not see much of a difference. You really don’t have to have this to get equal or damn close when you book then check in. Rooms are fluid and a moving target simply asking the desk agent for what’s available and you can see for usually very little uncharge a nicer room. You can many times “negotiate” with live agents when booking.Like a cruise ship unless it’s a special weekend who cares.

  3. Resort fees, parking fees, fees for this and fees for that, I’m done with Harrahs and MGM, I will no longer stay with any of these GREEDY Las Vegas casinos. And I have been going there for decades. I am sick of the nickel and dimeing from these rich GREEDY billionaire companys. I hope everyone stops going there and you lose your ass.

  4. Resort fees, parking fees, fees for this and fees for that, I’m done with Harrahs and MGM, I will no longer stay with any of these GREEDY Las Vegas casinos. And I have been going there for decades. I am sick of the nickel and dimeing from these rich GREEDY billionaire companys. I hope everyone stops going there and you lose your ass.

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