I don’t think there can possibly be any better advice in travel than ‘hang up and call back’. Any time you don’t get the answer you’re looking for, try another agent. Most airlines are big companies, agents have varying levels of competence, and also varying levels of helpfulness.

Just because an agent tells you that an award ticket isn’t available doesn’t mean that it isn’t available. I’ve frequently had agents tell me that nothing was available when they clearly hadn’t had time to even search yet. I would ask about multiple dates and they’d just reply that nothing was available the whole month when I know they couldn’t possibly have searched for that.

If you aren’t going to search for award space yourself using tools like partner websites (Qantas and British Airways for oneworld awards, Aeroplan/All Nippon/United.com for Star Alliance, AirFrance.us for most of Skyteam), FlightStats, Expertflyer, the KVS Tool, then the advice I give is to just hang up, call back. For novices who aren’t going to invest the time, my rule of thumb is to make three calls — get told no three times — before believing the answer that you get is truly ‘no’.

You Need to Luck Out to Find an Agent Willing to Help With What You’re Entitled To

US Airways agents may tell me that a specific flight isn’t available, but the next US Airways agent will see it without difficulty — I know to call back because I’ve already done my research and can see that it’s available. US Airways has had issues booking many partners for quite some time, sometimes it really is a limitation but often the agent doesn’t know what they’re doing or doesn’t want to help. I get emails asking me about the problem based on a single data point (phone call) when a subsequent call is all that’s needed.

Delta agents especially are a problem because they don’t know who their partners are much of the time, let alone how to look for award space (Skyteam is making progress but isn’t as normalized in what booking codes to use for award space across the different members of the alliance as Star and oneworld are). Plus they’re so trained by Delta’s poor IT, broken pricing engine, and lack of availability to assume that double and triple mileage awards are all that’s available.

Phone agents aren’t incentivized to be helpful, they aren’t rewarded for giving great service and trying hard to make things happen for you. I think the incentives are a shame. Some agents are great, but it’s because of their own internal drive — who they are — rather than the incentives they face. So you need to find those agents who will try hard for you, and since you don’t get to observe agents and pick the one you want you have to hang up and call back and play roulette until you find one.

You Need to Luck Out to Find an Agent Willing to Help With What You Aren’t Entitled To

The flip side of having to look for agents who are willing to work to give you what you are entitled to is that varying agent quality means that if you look long enough you’ll find one willing to do things for you that they aren’t supposed to.

I can’t tell you the number of times that I’ve gotten extra stopovers from US Airways, change fee waivers, or gotten upgrades confirmed that I probably shouldn’t have (such as getting confirmed upgrades on a flight that doesn’t require a co-pay with United and then getting moved into the same booking class on one that does). Or I’ve gotten ‘manual sells’ for award space back in the day from United when Mileage Plus used to ‘block’ otherwise-available award space, or from US Airways in recent times when they’ve done the same (although it’s gotten much harder to do that over the past year as agents know they aren’t supposed to).

If you want something you aren’t really entitled to, the same advice applies, hang up and call back enough there’s a reasonable chance that someone will do what you’re asking for. You aren’t guaranteed it, and it won’t always work, but there are enough agents who either don’t know, don’t care about the rules, or find the path of least resistance to be helpful that sometimes it works.

Build a Rapport With Your Agent

I want sympathy from an agent, to get them on my side, both so that they’ll go the distance and try hard to help me and also so that they’re willing to give me the benefit of the doubt on things where I may not be completely entitled to what I’m after.

So I never play the “don’t you know who I am?” card with my elite status. And I don’t play the “I know the rules and you need to do this” card. They don’t need to do what I want. Sure, I may be entitled to something. I may know the rules. And that means that if I push things hard enough with enough people I’ll probably eventually get what I want, or at least get compensation later if I don’t get what I want. But none of that means that a given agent is going to help me get what I want or what I think I’m entitled to. Remember they have little incentive to be helpful, they don’t generally get rewarded or punished based on how helpful they are to me. I may be entitled, but I have no entitlement from them.

Therefore I want to be their friend. I want to relate to them. I say please and thank you. I ask them how their day is going. I sympathize with the difficult job they’re doing, especially when things are crazy with the airlines (most often due to weather). Agents deal with unhappy people all day long, and that means I have an instant ‘in’. When there’s a customer in front of me at the airport or checking into a hotel that’s giving the agent a hard time, I will almost always get superior service because I can throw that person under the bridge. Call center agents almost always have recent frustrated customer experiences, maybe not from the most recent customer but from one earlier that day or the day before. “I know a lot of customers probably give you a hard time, but I really appreciate you taking the time to try to help me.” “We’re going to have an easy time of this, and I appreciate your help.”

Growing up with some family in the car business, the salesman was always on the side of the customer fighting against the nameless, faceless manager in the office. They’re fighting for you. Always blame the other guy, “my manager is being really difficult here, can you help me just a little bit with a higher downpayment?”

I don’t ever want to seem difficult to the agent on the phone, I ask them to go extra distances not for me but because my boss is going to kill me, can you possibly help? They can understand that. They can help bail me out, they can empathize.

Don’t Get Comments Left in Your Reservation

Here’s where hang up, call back stops working: you have an existing reservation, you ask for something from an agent and they find it to be an outrageous request, and they’re indignant enough that you shouldn’t get what you’re asking for (even when you’re entitled to it) that the agent enters comments into the reservation.

Those comments usually begin “Customer advised that…”

They write into your record that you aren’t allowed to do what you want and you’ve already been told that. So calling back you’re clearly trying to get away with something.

And the problem here is that agents will rarely contradict each other. Once one agent has documented your record that you aren’t allowed to do something, finding an agent willing to do it for you becomes orders of magnitude more difficult — occasionally you’ll find someone that either doesn’t read the comments or that really knows the rules well enough and is confident enough to contradict their colleague, but you need a ton more luck to find them.

I’ll often ask questions and fish for answers before even giving details on a current reservation I want to work on. If I get the answer I want then I’ll provide reservation details (this isn’t always possible, some agents will insist upfront). At the very least I’ll try to suss out how helpful and friendly an agent is before proceeding at all, and I’m willing to bail on a call early.

The other thing you can do is thank someone that tells you no, and end the call quickly. Don’t argue and make them feel like they need to document your record. You appreciate their help, the baby is crying or the dog is barking or you have a call on the other line and have to go. Get off the phone to preserve your ability to call back and talk to someone else.

I’ll also make a pitch here for international call centers. Some people hate them because English skills may not be great, because training may be poor, or because agents may be incapable of deviating from their script. But I find that international call center agents pretty much won’t ever document your record with negative comments. They’re rarely so confident in themselves as to put themselves on the line with negative comments. If I want something I am not entitled to, international agents can be great because there’s far less risk in asking them to do it.

Hold Times Make it Difficult to Stay Disciplined

Probably the biggest disincentive to hanging up and calling back, and I’ve fallen victim to this myself, is long call center hold times. I finally get through to the agent after waiting 20 minutes and don’t really want to start that process over again. So I push forward, I try to get the agent to help me, I argue with them about what’s possible or what the rules entitle me to. I get sucked in, against my better judgment. And it rarely ever works well.

The point here is twofold: the strategy isn’t costless, it takes more time to get what you want because you have to start over and that can entail waiting on hold, and also that it takes discipline — discipline that I don’t always have enough though I know better.

This Advice Applies to Dealing With Most Large Corporations

Hang up, call back is hardly unique to airlines or even hotels (although airline programs are usually more complicated than hotel programs, and hotel agents usually have less discretion to help since they’re acting on behalf of independently owned properties much of the time).

Large companies can be bureaucracies. They can be complex. They can be confusing. Training quality varies. And incentives are usually bad. That means you will get different answers each time you call, no matter which large organization you’re calling, whether it’s your cell phone provider or the IRS. Try it the next time you want a fee waived by AT&T or Chase.

  1. dhammer53 said,

    Back in the early days of Flyertalk, the expression used at the time was referred to as Flyertalk Mantra. Hang up, and call back, if the agent is ‘flexible’ (or smart). Wink. Gary, your advice is still sound today.

  2. dhammer53 said,

    Meant to say isn’t flexible.

  3. KL said,

    Great advice, Gary!

  4. Sean said,

    Hi Gary, you have been for air traffic controllers layoffs for a while now, writing multiple articles how everything is fine and everything will be fine. “After just two days of furloughs for air traffic controllers, more than 10,000 flights have been delayed and more than 600 canceled. Are you man enough to admit you made a mistake or double down. Just Saying

  5. tassojunior said,

    Think it’s commonly called HUCA

    (Hang Up, Call Again)

    HUCB doesn’t pronounce well.

  6. hjkbanker said,

    Do you know what airlines keep “digital notes” on each call?

  7. Gary said,

    Not sure where I have been in favor of air traffic control layoffs or why you call my manhood into question.. could you provide a link?

    Over the long term I see planes operating more like cars albeit with much enhanced technology obviating the need for ATC as we know it today but that is not the same thing.

    I have been saying atc layoffs are not necessary for a long time but that is the same position I hold today.

    So I am genuinely confused by this comment.

  8. Gary said,

    Generally only in a reservation if an agent chooses to enter them. Not really airline specific.

  9. Joseph said,

    It also helps if you request the customer rep search by segment. There have been multiple instances where I find availability on the Qantas website but AA reps cannot find it until they go into each segment, then tie it all back together.

  10. VG said,

    I have found your advice does work with airlines, hotels, and the travel industry. However, it seems there is no hope with AT&T, Directv, and other utility providers.

  11. sean said,

    It totally works.

  12. sean said,

    Had an agent hang up on me @ UA yesterday.

    Well, actually, transferred me to the Indian Call Center. They were able to help without the attitude.

    Proving, yet again, that entitlement cuts both ways.

  13. craz said,

    I found that if a person doesnt do their Homework 1st playing the game while Not knowing the rules isnt too smart. You end up wasting not only your own time but that of the agents as well as those who are placed on Hold and have to wait for the next agent.

    eg I want to fly on UA or a UA partner JFK-ZRH stay over 3 nights and then fly to FCO, on a 1 way award tkt.I can call till my fingers are down to the bone no agent will approve that since UA doesnt allow Stopovers > 24 hrs on 1 way Awards. Had I done my homework 1st I could have avoided wasting everyones time

    So simply saying to call and call back some more w/o having 1st done ones Homework is not the best advice imo

  14. tim said,

    Great post! Thanks

  15. CW said,

    @VG – for utilities/cable see if you can find a local account representative. If you live in an apartment building or even know someone who does, see if they can find who the rep assigned to the building or neighborhood is. Comcast/Verizon/etc. will usually assign an actual account manager. I did this when I lived in my last apartment building, and it worked like a charm. I was having some issues and direct calls/emails to this person fixed them almost immediately.

  16. Kris Ziel said,

    What would be your recommendation when you have to speak to a supervisor? In requesting them to open award F space, I have called at three times of the day and gotten three different responses, none of them agreeable.

  17. Dan said,

    I’m in the process of putting together an AA 1W award — the distanced based award that lets you pile on up to 16 segments, however you want.

    Call 1: Ticket 9 segments in J, no problem. Itinerary departs DCA and ends at JFK.
    Call 2: Changed one segment and added another, no problem.
    Call 3: Wanted to add the JFK-DCA segment. Agent can’t figure out why I want F so bad on this segment. “For a flight this short, you should just go Coach.” I tried to clarify that I’m adding this segment to a longer award that is already J. Agent still can’t figure out why I want to spend so many miles. Thankfully, there was only one F seat, so I got out of the call before she could f up my reservation.

  18. nsx at flyertalk said,

    Some people even apply this principle to dating!

  19. Jill said,

    Gary,

    What’s going on with US Airways and *A awards? I booked a business class award with some segments in coach thinking that I would make changes when seats became available later. Now that the seats are available, all the agents I have spoken to (US, UK, Germany) insist that they cannot make the change, even if I pay the change fee. They say my only option is to redeposit the miles and rebook, which I don’t want to do. Is this a new policy?

  20. Reversing Use of SWU. Is this possible? - Page 3 - FlyerTalk Forums said,

    [...] document.write(''); Regarding calling back, Gary Neff has an excellent article on his View From the Wing blog today: http://boardingarea.com/viewfr…ybe-even-life/ [...]

  21. Gary said,

    @Jill I have had lots of agents say that in the past and it is not policy

  22. Matthew said,

    Your advice is spot-on and comprehensive.

    Had to play the game this morning to get my upgrade to Dulles tonight…

  23. Melana said,

    Really great advice! I have had completely different outcomes because I have called back. I also make sure when I get a particularly helpful agent I leave feedback with a supervisor even if it is not requested. I feel that for all the times people complain about an agent, we should also take the time to praise the good ones. I hope that it helps gives incentive to keep being awesome and helpful and maybe even catch on to some colleagues!!

  24. Wedding Spend said,

    Experienced it myself recently when I tried to add a free one-way at the end of an AA award that was illegal since it exceeded the mileage limit. After one unhelpful agent, got through to a very helpful agent who pushed the help desk to issue the ticket without tacking on the extra miles needed. Ultimately, it still failed 3 days later when the ticket never got ticketed due to the system being smart enough to reject the ticket but there are agents who will go out of their way.

  25. Points Surfer said,

    Hi Gary,

    Funny that you post this just this morning and a few hours later it became very useful to me. Called AA and the first two agents were not helpful at all, and it was easy to tell they just didn’t want to try too. However, third time was the charm – and this agent really went the extra mile for me. I made sure to write down her name and her supervisor’s email address so I can let them know just how very helpful she was.

    Thank you also for posting this, Gary. It was incredibly useful to have read this this morning!

  26. Dan R said,

    I once got some good advice from a deadbeat business partner of mine. She was always late or delinquent on payments, and had become quite experienced in dealing with the call centers of financial institutions.

    She would tell me that if you’re going to ask for something, it’s best to call during the overnight hours or on weekends. The chances are better that you’ll get a rep who looks at her employment as a “job” versus a “career”. “Job” reps were more likely to try to help you out. “Career” reps were more likely to strictly follow the corporate letter of the law, in order to enhance their future prospects.

    I suspect this may apply to airline call centers too.

  27. Southside said,

    Good post, Gary. I think many of us know about this general approach to varying extents, but you laid out the details nicely.

  28. eco mama said,

    I agree (Melana) that giving positive feedback to the agent’s supervisor, or send a nice email is a great way to promote good customer service and almost always go out of my way to do this for someone who has gone out of their way for me.

  29. Ram said,

    Gary, thanks for taking the time to make this detailed post.
    ‘craz’, thanks for your comment about being familiar with the rules before going into the HUCA mode.

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    I have often had good results with the airlines if I call the “web assistance” telephone number. They are more often than not better English-speakers and even more importantly, more patient with problems with reservations systems. They will often waive extra charges that are sometimes imposed by speaking to a “live agent.”

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  46. Joe said,

    @VG rule # 1 with any Cable/Sat/phone provider and even “others” is ALWAYS first ask for the disconnect dept
    tell them you want to know when your billing cycle is up
    they will ask why be NICE ” I know this is not your fault but” explain problem guess what BOOM you just got what you wanted, I have had 6 mos free directv added to my acct at&t free iPhone with 8 mos till my next upgrade and the list goes on and on. ALWAYS be nice say I know this isn’t your fault but this is my problem… it WILL be fixed to your liking. Joe

  47. Joe said,

    rule # 2 refer to rule# 1

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